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Don’t Miss This Opportunity to Make a Difference

Dear Colleagues and Friends:

Whether we like it or not, tax reform is here. As with any economic change, you may be assessing your finances and wondering how you will be impacted, here at NHCOA, we are. It is important for us to share with you that this newly passed legislation may impact the tax benefits of your 2018 charitable giving, particularly if you currently itemize.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act provides for several new lower tax rates, it nearly doubles the standard deduction, and eliminates both personal exemptions and almost all itemized deductions. Although the legislation maintains the current-law income tax charitable deduction, it will significantly reduce the number of taxpayers who itemize and effectively eliminate the income tax charitable deduction for a vast majority of Americans.

If you plan to itemize for 2017, you may wish to consider making a gift this calendar year to realize the full tax benefit. Additionally, it may make sense for you to accelerate some charitable contributions planned for 2018 into 2017 to receive a larger income tax charitable deduction this year.

It’s Not Too Late

To ensure you maximize a tax break for this year (when you itemize deductions on your income tax returns) you must make your gift before Dec. 31. Here are a few important things to know:

Credit Card: A last-minute gift can be made online through Dec. 31 by visiting NHCOA’s website

Checks: To send a last-minute gift by mail, please send your gift via the U.S. Postal Service to ensure your envelope has a postmark on or before Dec. 30 (the last day post offices are open) to the National Hispanic Council on Aging, 2201 12th St NW, Suite 101, Washington, DC 20009.

If you have any questions about gifting, please contact Fatima Velez at finance@nhcoa.org.

Talk With Your Tax Professional

Please consult with your tax or financial advisors to determine if increasing or accelerating your giving in 2017 is beneficial for your particular situation.

If you are interested in making a year-end gift to help improve the lives of Hispanic older adults, their families and caregivers, or if you have any questions, please contact me right away with questions.  I, or one of my colleagues, would be happy to help.

Thank you for your support and happy holidays from all of us at the National Hispanic Council on Aging.

Sincerely,

Yanira Cruz, DrPH, MPH

President and CEO

Holiday Silver Lining: Avoiding Foodborne Illnesses While Traveling with Food

Washington, D.C. December, 2017.- As if the winter holidays are not enough stress, between making your gift list, shopping for gifts and deciding which party to attend, some of us add holiday travel to our to-do lists. Immediately following the decision to visit relative or friends for the holidays comes the big question — what food to bring to the party? Just the thought of all of this can be stressful, but don’t worry here is some food safety traveling advice.

The first step to make traveling with food safe and memorable while avoiding the risk of foodborne illness is to plan ahead. Get to know your food options for better decision making:

• “Shelf stable” foods can be safely stored at room temperature; such as fruit cakes, country hams or canned cranberry sauce. However, not all canned goods are shelf stable. Some canned food, such as canned ham and seafood, are not safe at room temperature. These will be labeled “Keep Refrigerated.”

• If you are traveling with perishable foods (those likely to spoil or become unsafe if not kept refrigerated at 40°F or below), place them in a cooler with ice or freezer packs. Examples of foods that must be kept refrigerated for safety include meat, poultry, fish, dairy products and all cooked foods. Have plenty of ice or frozen gel packs on hand before starting to pack the food.

If you take perishable foods along for eating while traveling, or to cook at your destination, plan to keep everything on ice in your cooler.The second step to traveling with food is to pack properly so it will be safe to eat when you reach your destination. Always remember to bring an appliance thermometer to check the temperature inside the cooler when you reach your destination. When packing perishable food:

• Pack directly from the refrigerator or freezer into the portable cooler. Meat and poultry may be packed while it is still frozen; that way it stays colder longer (40°F or below).  Also, a full cooler will maintain its cold temperature longer than one that is partially filled. If the cooler is only partially filled, pack the remaining space with more ice or frozen gel packs. Be sure to keep raw meat and poultry wrapped separately from cooked foods, or ready-to-eat foods, such as fruits or bread. Limit the times the cooler is opened to keep it colder longer. Open and close the cooler lid quickly, but only open it when necessary.

• If you are traveling with hot foods, you can use an insulated container to keep the food hot. Fill the container with boiling water, let stand for a few minutes, empty and then put in the piping hot food. Keep the insulated container closed to keep the food hot — 140°F or above.

We hope this food safety traveling guidance will ease your holiday travel and you can find the silver lining to avoid any foodborne illnesses — the ultimate holiday gift.

Consumers with questions about food safety can call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or chat live with a food safety specialist in English or Spanish at AskKaren.gov, available from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday. AskKaren provides live chats as well as food safety information 24/7.

By: Janice López-Muñoz, BS, MSIH, Public Affairs Specialist, Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA

Lo positivo en los días festivos: Evitar intoxicaciones mientras viajamos con alimentos

Washington, D.C. Diciembre, 2017.- Como si los días festivos no fueran suficiente estrés, entre preparar la lista de regalos, ir a comprarlos y decidir a qué fiesta asistir, algunos de nosotros tenemos que añadir a nuestra lista de pendientes- viajar. Una vez decidimos visitar a familiares o amigos durante los días festivos inmediatamente viene la gran pregunta- ¿qué alimentos voy a llevar a la fiesta? El solo pensar en eso puede causar estrés; pero no se preocupe que aquí le compartimos recomendaciones de seguridad alimentaria para para viajar con sus alimentos.

El primer paso para un viaje memorable y con seguridad alimentaria, mientras se evita el riesgo de intoxicaciones alimentarias es planificar con tiempo. Tome tiempo para conocer las opciones de alimentos que tiene para una mejor decisión.

Los alimentos de larga duración (“shelf stable”) pueden ser almacenados a temperatura ambiente; por ejemplo pastel (torta) de frutas, jamón campesino (“country ham”) o salsa de arándanos en lata. Sin embargo, no todos los alimentos en lata son de larga duración.

Algunos alimentos, como por ejemplo jamón o mariscos en lata, no están seguros a temperatura ambiente. Estos alimentos indicarán en la etiqueta “manténgase refrigerado” (“keep refrigerated”).

Si usted está viajando con alimentos perecederos (aquellos que  probablemente se echen a perder o se vuelvan inseguros si no se mantienen refrigerados a 40°F ó menos), colóquelos en una nevera portátil con hielo o paquetes de gel congelados. Ejemplos de estos alimentos incluyen carnes, aves, pescados, productos lácteos y todos los alimentos cocidos.

Tenga a la mano suficiente hielo o paquetes de gel congelados antes de comenzar a empacar los alimentos. Si usted va a viajar con alimentos perecederos para consumir en el camino o para cocinarlos al llegar a su destino, planifique mantener todo con hielo en su nevera portátil.

El segundo paso para viajar con sus alimentos es empacarlos apropiadamente para que se mantengan seguros hasta llegar a su destino. Siempre recuerde llevar con usted un termómetro de electrodomésticos para verificar la temperatura dentro de la nevera portátil cuando llegue a su destino.

Al empacar alimentos perecederos:

Empaque directamente del refrigerador o del congelador a la nevera portátil.

Las carnes y aves pueden empacarse mientras están congeladas; de esa forma los alimentos se mantienen fríos por más tiempo (40°F ó menos).

También, una nevera portátil completamente llena mantendrá la temperatura fría por más tiempo que aquella que esté parcialmente llena. Si la nevera portátil está parcialmente llena, coloque más hielo o paquetes de gel congelados en el espacio restante.

Asegúrese de mantener las carnes y aves crudas envueltas separadas de los alimentos cocidos o listos para consumir como frutas o pan.

Limite el número de veces que la nevera portátil sea abierta para mantenerla fría por más tiempo. Abra y cierre la tapa rápido, pero solo ábrala cuando sea necesario.

Si usted viaja con alimentos calientes, puede usar un recipiente con aislamiento térmico para mantener los alimentos calientes. Llene el recipiente con agua hirviendo, déjelo reposar por unos cuantos minutos, vacíelo y luego coloque los alimentos bien calientes.

Mantenga el recipiente con aislamiento térmico cerrado para mantener los alimentos calientes- 140 ° F ó más.

Esperamos que estas guías para viajar con seguridad alimentaria le faciliten su viaje para los días festivos y que usted pueda encontrar el lado positivo evitando intoxicaciones alimentarias como un gran regalo para celebrar los días festivos.

Consumidores con preguntas de seguridad alimentaria pueden llamar a la Línea de Información Sobre Carnes y Aves al 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) o charlar en vivo con un especialista en seguridad
alimentaria en PregunteleaKaren.gov, disponible de lunes a viernes desde las 10:00am hasta las 6:00 pm, hora del este.

Por: Janice López-Muñoz, BS, MSIH, Especialista en Asuntos Públicos, Servicio de Inocuidad e Inspección del Alimentos, Departamento de Agricultura de los Estados Unidos (FSIS, USDA)

Home Fire Safety for Older Adults

Washington, D.C. December, 2017.- Older adults (ages 65+) are burdened with the gravest fire risk.  They are consistently more threatened with death or injury by fire than any other age group. Raising awareness among older adults is the key to reducing home fires and preventing deaths.

Understanding the common causes of home fires is the critical first step in preventing them.  Year after year, cooking, heating, and electrical equipment continue to be among the leading causes of home fires.

This presentation outlines fire prevention strategies related to each of these major causes, as well as key fire safety preparation strategies, such as escape planning and smoke alarm maintenance.  Presenter notes are included for each slide to assist you with the delivery of your community awareness presentation.

ESFI encourages you to use this presentation and the complementary Home Fire Safety Awareness for Older Adults Awareness Program resources to promote fire safety awareness among the older adults in your community.

For additional information, please contact ESFI at info@esfi.org or (703) 841-3229.

“The character of a country is defined by how we treat our most vulnerable citizens”

By Nicolás Peña

Washington, D.C. December 2017.- “Let’s work together to make sure that all seniors can age in serenity and dignity, knowing that they are secure and cared for by the people, community, and nation that they served for so long. The character of a country is defined by how we treat our most vulnerable citizens”, highlighted Dr. Yanira Cruz, President and CEO of the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), during NHCOA’s Annual Awards Dinner and Fundraiser.

It was a special celebration held at the Mexican Cultural Institute to honor dedicated people, who have made meaningful and lasting contributions in the field of aging.

Launching its annual Hall of Fame, NHCOA revealed the “Class of 2017,” which was inducted during the gala. Following are the inaugural members:

  • Alejandro Garcia a former chair of the National Hispanic Council on Aging Board of Directors.
  • Carmela Lacayo is the founder and current President and CEO of the National Association for Hispanic Elderly.
  • Fernando Torres-Gil is well recognized and respected academic who currently serves as a Professor of Social Welfare and Public Policy at UCLA.
  • Josefina Carbonell is the Senior Vice President of Long-Term Care and Nutrition at Independent Living Systems (ILS).
  • (†) Marta Sotomayor was a founder, and the first executive director of the National Hispanic Council on Aging.
  • (†) Ophelia Sandoval Rinaldi was a founder and former board member of the National Hispanic Council on Aging.
  • Raul Yzaguirre is an American civil rights activist who has made significant contributions to the aging field.

The first award of the night was The Special Recognition Award to Congressman Raul Ruiz, for his commitment to improving the health of diverse populations. “On behalf of the thousands of Hispanic older adults we serve, Our Board of Directors, and our Business Advisory Council members, I want to express our gratitude for all the support, guidance, and leadership of Congressman Raul Ruiz”, said Dr. Cruz, who presented the award.

During the award ceremony, the Assistant Secretary for Aging and ACL’s Administrator, Lance Robertson, highlighted the importance of supporting families and caregivers, protecting rights and preventing abuse, connecting people to resources, expanding employment opportunities, and strengthening the aging and disability networks.

AARP, honoring its social commitment, became one of the most important partners for NHCOA this past year. During the gala and on behalf of the National Hispanic Council on Aging, Yvette Peña, AARP’s Vice President for Hispanic/Latino Audience Strategy presented The Caregiving AARP Service Award to José Acarón, State Director of AARP Puerto Rico.

The Office of Minority Health (OMH) has been an important partner to NHCOA, and Dr. Matthew Lin, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health and Director of the OMH at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, was honored with The Special Recognition Award for his commitment to improving the health of diverse populations.

John Feather, PhD, Chief Executive Officer of Grantmakers  In Aging (GIA), accepted the 2017 Ophelia Rinaldi Lifetime Achievement Award that recognizes Dr. Feather’s decades of work in philanthropy, gerontology, education, and his commitment to improving the lives of older adults, and his past service on the board of the National Hispanic Council on Aging.

The Outstanding Community Service Award went to Blanca Stumpo for demonstrating excellence, innovation and commitment to the wellbeing of Hispanic older adults.

The Entrepreneurship Recognition Award went to Abimarlee Martinez, Marketing Manager for Telemundo Washington D.C.,  for her commitment to advancing and innovating public and private partnership to improve the wellbeing of our society, and the President’s Award went to Claudia Carravetta, AbbVie’s Director for Government Affairs, for her strong commitment to supporting policy and programs valuable to Hispanic families.

Television personality, public speaker, and activist Marco Antonio Regil served as Master of Ceremony of NHCOA’s Annual Awards Dinner. Mr. Regil shared his experience as a caregiver in a viewing of “Cada Paso del Camino” a documentary produced by AARP.

The Fundraising Session was guided by Dr. Anderson Torres, the President of R.A.I.N. TOTAL CARE, INC. R.A.I.N. Services include: 12 Full-Service Senior Centers, Home Delivered Meals, Home Care Services serving Homebound Persons of all ages, Integrated Care Coordination, Housing, Case Management, Advocacy, Support Groups for the Elderly and their Caregivers, Alzheimer’s initiatives, Transportation and Intergenerational programs.

NHCOA’s Annual Awards Dinner was sponsored by: AARP, Abbott, Anthem, AbbVie, America’s Biopharmaceutical Companies- GOBOLDLY, Compassion & Choices, Herbalife, Pfizer, Verizon and UnitedHealthcare.

Gallery

Caregiving – Let’s bring it out of the shadows!

By Nicolás Peña

Washington, D.C. November 2017. – To continue a national dialogue that spotlights the acknowledgement and support of the caregiver’s role was the conclusion that closed the third edition of the Hispanic Caregiving Thought Leaders Roundtable that ended on Friday, November 17th, 2017.

This gathering convened and organized by the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), was held at HealthInsight, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and was attended by 31 professionals with expertise in the field of aging, specifically focused on Hispanic older adults, their families, and caregivers.

The collaboration and discussion that transpired in this gathering was used to establish the baseline issues that helped to identify the role of caregivers and the training required to build acceptance and commonality among them. Those who were participating and the takeaways of their collective responses are intended to address the realities of caregivers.

Taking caregivers “out of the shadows” was the challenge that Albuquerque Chapter collaboratively decided upon, and in order to achieve this goal, they are going to use their experiences in New Mexico to move forward their agenda  on aging. Here are a few of their recommendations:

  • Admitting that they accept the role of a caregiver
  • Education and understanding of who a caregiver actually is
  • Identifying and understanding their value as a caregiver
  • How paid or unpaid caregiving fits into the equation

On October 20, 2017, The National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), led the Hispanic Caregiving Thought Leaders Roundtable, which was held at the American Cancer Society headquarters in New York City. The attendees concluded that in order to achieve the goal of wellbeing and aging with dignity for older adults, it is necessary to guarantee the emotional and physical health of those who take care of them, as well as their financial stability.

The following list below represents the contributors and participants who were present at The Hispanic Caregiving Thought Leaders Roundtable in New Mexico.

Facilitators:

Cindy Padilla – Chair, Board of Directors – NHCOA.

Eugene Varela – State Director – AARP New Mexico.

Introduction:

Dr. Yanira Cruz – President and CEO of NHCOA

Presentations:

Marcia Medina – Director, Non-Metro Area Agency on Aging, North Central NM Economic Development District.

Liz Hamm – Field Representative, Congresswoman Michelle Lujan Grisham.

Virginia Dickson-AARP Volunteer.

Asia Negron-Esposito – AARP Volunteer.

María Gutierrez – Caregiver.

Agnes Vallejos  – Former Director of Alzheimer’s Association in New Mexico.

Michele Jacquez-Ortiz – Caregiver

Dave Nezzie  – Rep. Sen. Martin Heinrich.

Aurora Sanchez – Saint Vincent de Paul Archdiocesan Council of Santa Fe.

Clifford M. Rees, JD, Constituent Liaison, Office of Congressman Ben Ray Lujan (NM-03).

Josefina Mata – Executive Director, Concilio CDS Inc.

Rhonda Romero  – Social Security Administration

Carlos Moya – Division Director, Consumer & Elder Rights, NM Aging & Long-Term Services Dept.

Jere Kelly – SAGE Albuquerque Advisory Committee Member and Retired Geriatrician.

Meriah Heredia-Griego – Director of the University of New Mexico’s Center for Education Policy Research (CEPR).

Verónica Plaza, MD, MPH – University of New Mexico, Office of Community Health and Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Revathi A-Davidson, MA, MPH – Healthcare and Hospital Administration (Retired)

Lorrie Griego – Presbyterian Healthcare Services, Program Manager for Advance Care Planning and New Mexico State Director.

Leah Steimel, MPH – Encuentro, Fourfold Partners, Albuquerque, NM.

Edward Ackron – Program Manager, Office of Indian Elder Affairs (OIEA).

Jason Aleman – Associate Executive Director, Encuentro, Fourfold Partners, Albuquerque, NM.

Randella Bluehouse – Executive Director, National Indian Council on Aging.

Michelle Briscoe – City of Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Area Agency on Aging, Department of Family and Community Services.

Gino Rinaldi – Director, Santa Fe Senior Services.

David Ramirez – Trill Multicultural

Amos Atencio – NHCOA Board Member.

Margy Weinbar – Executive Director, HealthInsight New Mexico

Patricia Montoya – Executive Director, NM Coalition for Healthcare Value.

Hispanic & Latino Caregivers, a sacarlos de las sombras!

Por Nicolás Peña

Washington, D.C. Noviembre 2017.- Con el compromiso de continuar un diálogo nacional que permita la institucionalización de la labor del caregiver, culminó el viernes 17 de noviembre, la tercera edición de la Hispanic Caregiving Thought Leaders Roundtable.

El encuentro organizado por el Consejo Nacional Hispano para el Adulto Mayor, (NHCOA por sus siglas en inglés), se desarrolló en la sede de HealthInsight, ubicada en la ciudad de Albuquerque, New Mexico, y  contó con la participación de 31 expertos en temas relacionados con el adulto mayor, sus familiares, y quienes cuidan de ellos.

La información como base para identificar el rol del caregiver y el entrenamiento como método de formación y aceptación, fueron los puntos de encuentro entre la mayoría de los asistentes. “Sacarlos de la sombra” fue el reto, que desde lo local, se planteo el Capítulo Albuquerque, que se apoyará en la experiencia y liderazo del estado de New Mexico sobre los temas del adulto mayor Hispano.

Recientemente, NHCOA lideró la Hispanic Caregiving Thought Leaders Roundtable – New York Edition, desarrollada en la Sociedad Americana contra el Cáncer, y en donde los asistente llegaron a la conclusión de que para lograr el bienestar y acompañamiento digno de los adultos mayores, es necesario garantizar la salud emocional y física de quienes cuidan de ellos, así como su estabilidad económica.

A continuación, el listado de los participantes durante la Hispanic Caregiving Thought Leaders Roundtable – New Mexico Edition:

Facilitadores:

Cindy Padilla

Chair, Board of Directors, NHCOA.

Eugene Varela

State Director, AARP New Mexico.

Apertura:

Dra. Yanira Cruz, presidenta de NHCOA

Intervenciones:

Marcia Medina – Director, Non-Metro Area Agency on Aging, North Central NM Economic Development District.

Liz Hamm – Field Representative, Congresswoman Michelle Lujan Grisham.

Virginia Dickson-AARP Volunteer.

Asia Negron-Esposito – AARP Volunteer.

María Gutierrez – Caregiver.

Agnes Vallejos  – Former Director of Alzheimer’s Association in New Mexico.

Michele Jacquez-Ortiz – Caregiver

Dave Nezzie  – Rep. Sen. Martin Heinrich.

Aurora Sanchez – Saint Vincent de Paul Archdiocesan Council of Santa Fe.

Clifford M. Rees, JD, Constituent Liaison, Office of Congressman Ben Ray Lujan (NM-03).

Josefina Mata – Executive Director, Concilio CDS Inc.

Rhonda Romero  – Social Security Administration

Carlos Moya – Division Director, Consumer & Elder Rights, NM Aging & Long-Term Services Dept.

Jere Kelly – SAGE Albuquerque Advisory Committee Member and Retired Geriatrician.

Meriah Heredia-Griego – Director of the University of New Mexico’s Center for Education Policy Research (CEPR).

Verónica Plaza, MD, MPH – University of New Mexico, Office of Community Health and Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Revathi A-Davidson, MA, MPH – Healthcare and Hospital Administration (Retired)

Lorrie Griego – Presbyterian Healthcare Services, Program Manager for Advance Care Planning and New Mexico State Director.

Leah Steimel, MPH – Encuentro, Fourfold Partners, Albuquerque, NM.

Edward Ackron – Program Manager, Office of Indian Elder Affairs (OIEA).

Jason Aleman – Associate Executive Director, Encuentro, Fourfold Partners, Albuquerque, NM.

Randella Bluehouse – Executive Director, National Indian Council on Aging.

Michelle Briscoe – City of Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Area Agency on Aging, Department of Family and Community Services.

Gino Rinaldi – Director, Santa Fe Senior Services.

David Ramirez – Trill Multicultural

Amos Atencio – NHCOA Board Member.

Margy Weinbar – Executive Director, HealthInsight New Mexico

Patricia Montoya – Executive Director, NM Coalition for Healthcare Value.

 

Consejos y Recursos para un Día de Acción de Gracias Libre de Bacterias

Por: Tanya Brown, Especialista en Asuntos Públicos, FSIS-USDA

En el Día de Acción de Gracias se consume más de 46 millones de pavos acompañados por una lista
interminable de platos y postres para acompañar, esta cena es por mucho, la más grande y estresante
que muchos consumidores preparan en todo el año; dejando espacio para errores que pueden enfermar
a los invitados.

“Nosotros recibimos un aumento de llamadas en la Línea de Información Sobre Carnes y Aves del USDA
cercano a la fecha de Acción de Gracias porque las personas están muy estresadas y tienen muchas
preguntas sobre como descongelar y cocinar su pavo,” dijo Marianne Gravely, especialista en
información técnica senior en el Servicio de Inocuidad e Inspección de Alimentos del Departamento de
Agricultura de los Estados Unidos (USDA-FSIS, por sus siglas en inglés). “Ya que esto es una fiesta
familiar grande, nosotros queremos asegurarnos que las personas preparen sus alimentos de una
manera segura para evitar enfermedades trasmitidas por los alimentos.”

Siga los siguientes consejos y utilice estos recursos para ayudar a hacer esta fiesta de Acción de Gracias
una segura y salubre.

Fresco o Congelado

Si va a comprar un pavo fresco, cómprelo de uno a dos (1-2) días antes de planificar cocinarlo y
colóquelo en el refrigerador hasta que usted esté listo para cocinarlo. No compre pavos frescos ya
rellenos. Si no se manipulan de manera apropiada, bacterias dañinas que podrían estar en el relleno se
podrían multiplicar rápidamente.

Los pavos congelados se deben descongelar en el refrigerador. Permita 24 horas por cada 4 a 5 libras.
Por ejemplo, si usted compra un pavo de 12 a 16 libras, usted va a necesitar de tres a cuatro (3-4) días
para descongelar en el refrigerador. Un pavo congelado ya relleno no debe descongelarse. Siga las
instrucciones en el empaque y cocine directamente del estado congelado.

• No Lave el Ave

De acuerdo a la Administración de Medicamentos y Alimentos de los Estados Unidos (FDA, por sus siglas
en inglés) 68% de las personas lavan el pavo antes de cocinarlo; sin embargo, USDA no lo recomienda
porque lavar carnes o aves crudas puede salpicar bacterias alrededor del fregadero, a través de los
mostradores y a comidas ya preparadas. Cocinar el pavo a la temperatura interna correcta de 165 °F
matará cualquier bacteria, haciendo que lavar el ave sea un paso innecesario. La excepción a esta norma
es marinar en agua salada. Cuando esté lavando el pavo para remover la marinada de agua salada,
asegúrese de remover todos los otros alimentos u objetos del fregadero, coloque papel toalla en toda el
área y utilice una corriente de agua lenta para evitar que salpique.

• Use un Termómetro de Alimentos

La única manera para determinar si un pavo (o cualquier carne, ave o marisco) está cocida es verificando
la temperatura interna con un termómetro de alimentos. Un pavo entero debe verificarse en tres
partes: en la parte más profunda del muslo, en la parte más profunda del ala y en la parte más gruesa de
la pechuga. Su termómetro debe registrar 165 °F en las tres partes.

• Limpie el Refrigerador para los Sobrantes de Alimentos

Un día o dos antes del día de fiesta, asegúrese de limpiar cualquier alimento viejo ocupando espacio en
su refrigerador. Si usted no está seguro si aún está bueno para consumir, descargue nuestra aplicación
FoodKeeper. Está disponible para descargar en los dispositivos Apple y Android, la aplicación provee
tiempos de almacenamiento para más de 400 alimentos. Una vez su refrigerador esté limpio, usted
tendrá espacio para guardar todos los sobrantes de alimentos del Día de Acción de Gracias. No deje los
sobrantes de alimentos en la mesa o mostrador para que las personas coman, porque los alimentos van
a entrar en la zona de peligro (temperaturas entre 40 °F y 140 °F) donde las bacterias se multiplican
rápidamente. Mejor, coloque los alimentos en recipientes poco hondos y colóquelos en el refrigerador.

• ¿Tiene Preguntas? Llame a la Línea de Información Sobre Carnes y Aves del USDA

Si tiene dudas acerca de su cena de Acción de Gracias, llame a la Línea de Información Sobre Carnes y
Aves del USDA al 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) para hablar con un experto en seguridad
alimentaria. Usted también puede charlar en vivo en PregunteleaKaren.gov, disponible de lunes a
viernes desde las 10 a.m. a 6 p.m. ET, en inglés y español. Si usted necesita ayuda el Día de Acción de
Gracias, la Línea de Información Sobre de Carnes y Aves del USDA está disponible de 8 a.m. a 2 p.m. ET

Tips and Resources for a Bacteria-Free Thanksgiving

By: Tanya Brown, FSIS Public Affairs Specialist

More than 46 million turkeys are eaten on Thanksgiving Day and with the never-ending list of side dishes and desserts, it is by far the largest and most stressful meal many consumers prepare all year, leaving room for mistakes that can make guests sick.

“We receive an increase of calls on the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline around Thanksgiving because people are stressed and have a lot of questions about thawing and cooking their turkey,” said Marianne Gravely, senior technical specialist at USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service. “Since this is such a large family feast, we want to make sure people prepare their food in a safe manner to avoid foodborne illness.”

Follow these tips and use these resources to help make this Thanksgiving feast a safe and healthy one.

Fresh or Frozen

If buying a fresh turkey, purchase one to two days before you plan to cook it and place it in the refrigerator until you are ready to cook. Do not buy fresh, pre-stuffed turkeys. If not properly handled, harmful bacteria that may be in the stuffing can multiply quickly.

Frozen turkeys should be thawed in the refrigerator. Allow 24 hours for every 4 to 5 pounds. For example, if you purchase a 12 to 16 pound turkey, it will need three to four days to thaw in the refrigerator. A pre-stuffed frozen turkey should not be thawed. Follow the packaging directions and cook directly from the frozen state.

Don’t Wash the Bird

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 68 percent of people wash their turkey before cooking; however, USDA does not recommended it because washing raw meat or poultry can splash bacteria around the sink, across countertops and into already prepared foods. Cooking turkey to the correct internal temperature of 165ºF will kill any bacteria, making washing an unnecessary step. The exception to this rule is brining. When rinsing brine off of a turkey, be sure to remove all other food or objects from the sink, layer the area with paper towels and allow a slow stream of water to avoid splashing.

Use a Food Thermometer

The only way to determine if a turkey (or any meat, poultry or seafood) is cooked is to check its internal temperature with a food thermometer. A whole turkey should be checked in three locations: the innermost part of the thigh, the innermost part of the wing and the thickest part of the breast. Your thermometer should register 165°F in all three places.

Clear out Fridge for Leftovers

A day or two before the holiday, be sure to clear out any old food taking up space in your refrigerator. If you aren’t sure if it’s still good to eat, download our Foodkeeper app. It’s available for download on Apple and Android devices, the app provides storage times for more than 400 food items. Once your refrigerator is clear, you will have room to store all of those Thanksgiving leftovers. Do not leave leftovers on the table or countertop for people to graze, because food will enter into the danger zone (temperatures between 40ºF and 140ºF) where
bacteria multiply rapidly. Instead, place food in shallow containers and place them in the refrigerator.

Have Questions? Call the Hotline

If you have questions about your Thanksgiving dinner, call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) to talk to a food safety expert. You can also chat live at AskKaren.gov, available from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, in English and Spanish. If you need help on Thanksgiving Day, the Meat and Poultry Hotline is available from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET

Results of the National Hispanic Council on Aging’s 2017 National Caregiving Survey

NHCOA/Washington, D.C. November, 2017.- Family has always been at the heart of Hispanic values. A big part of that value includes caring for our elders. In fact, providing care for our elders is often considered an honor and is performed willingly. However, caregiving does not come without its own challenges.

As life expectancies grow, we are faced with concerns about health (e.g., chronic disease, dementia, etc.), health care costs, financial stability, and housing. Many of these issues have Hispanic families turning to each other even more for physical, emotional and financial support.

This year, the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), along with its partners, has focused on the needs of Hispanic family caregivers. Over the course of the past year, among other things, NHCOA implemented a National Caregiving Survey. The Hispanic older adults and caregivers that participated in this survey and our other events were enthusiastic about working to support caregivers and were dedicated to addressing the burdens of caregiving for Latino caregivers.

The challenges faced by Hispanic caregivers may seem daunting, but the dedication of community leaders, Hispanic focused nonprofit organizations, decision makers and experts working together can find solutions to the challenges and ease the burdens of caregiving for Hispanic caregivers. Here we share the results of the National Caregiving Survey.

NHCOA’s National Caregivers Survey was administered in Spanish and English and could be taken online or in-person at various NHCOA events. Many local community-based organizations and community leaders were instrumental in disseminating this survey to survey takers. The target audience was Latino caregivers. Survey participation was voluntary and anonymous. The goal of the 2017 survey was to:

  • Understand the demographics of Latino caregivers,
  • Describe the challenges caregivers face, and
  • Recognize what resources are needed to aid caregivers in their roles.

Over 7 months (March – September), NHCOA surveyed 158 Hispanic caregivers. Eighty-nine (89) participants took the survey in English and sixty-nine (69) participants took the survey in Spanish. One-in-four (25%) caregivers were age 65 and older, with an average age of 54. The age range of survey takers ranged from 26 years old to 82 years old.

The vast majority of caregivers were employed (64%) and had incomes greater than $30,000 (57%). More than 80% of Hispanic caregivers provided care for a friend or family member:

  • Parent/Parent-in-law (50%),
  • Spouse/Partner (13%),
  • Child (12%),
  • Friend/Neighbor (8%), and
  • Other (31%).*

*Note the percentages do not total 100% as caregivers could select multiple categories.

Survey respondents lived in 19 states, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C. Most respondents live in Maryland (30%), California (16%) and Florida (15%), the sites of this year’s regional conferences. Eighteen countries/territories of origin were represented by caregivers who took the survey, with most having been born in the United States (17%), Puerto Rico (13%), Mexico (13%), and El Salvador (11%).

Half of caregivers live with the ones they are caring for and more than half (52%) of caregivers have been providing care for more than 5 years. Additionally, when we asked about the amount of time spent on caregiving, we found that 29% of caregivers spent less than 8 hours a week on caregiving, 22% spent 9-20 hours a week, 15% spent 21-30 hours a week, 11% spent 31-40 hours a week on, and 23% spent more than 40 hours a week on caregiving tasks.

Caregivers provide a range of services and assistance for those they are caring for. To better understand the types of assistance that Latino caregivers currently provide to their loved ones, we asked “What kind of assistance do you provide?” Caregivers were able to select multiple services. Most caregivers tended to provide everyday assistance such as meal prep, assisting with medical visits, transportation, household chores, administering medication, etc.

Caregivers provide care to individuals with a variety of conditions including advanced age, dementia, and cancer. This experience can be a chronic stressor, and caregivers often experience detrimental psychological, behavioral, and physiological effects on their daily lives and health. Latino caregivers overwhelmingly reported (71%) that caregiving is taking an emotional toll on them.

Latino caregivers were asked to list their top three challenges they have experienced as a caregiver. Most caregivers (64%) reported that balancing other family and personal responsibilities was among their top three challenges as caregivers. The least reported challenge (44%) was communicating with health care providers. Other challenges included finding information and educational resources for caregivers (47%), having enough money to afford caregiving (48%), and understanding government programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, SSI, SNAP, etc. (56%). We also asked caregivers about their changes in employment status due to their caregiving roles and found that slightly more than half (51%) had no change in jobs status. The major change reported was a decrease in hours, however, only 13% reported that change. This year NHCOA is working on a strategy to support caregivers in their roles. To that end, we asked what Spanish language resources caregivers would like to have. Caregivers were able to choose multiple options and overwhelmingly caregivers wanted to see assistance with government programs in Spanish (57%) and trainings on stress management (56%). Another major concerns among Latino caregivers is that many are untrained, and half of caregivers wanted to trainings on caregiving techniques in Spanish.